薔薇殺しのカーミラ // Baragoroshi no Carmilla // Koumajou Densetsu II Final Boss Theme

^The artist who does the character designs for the Koumajou Densetsu series. (Banpai Akira)

I used Carmilla instead of Camilla because “Carmilla” is the name of the female vampire from the original Irish novel. Camilla just sort of happened with American localization.

Requested by Rumia_13.

I’m thinking of reworking the site after I’ve got another month’s worth of songs out. What do you think?

Notes:
ああ 風断ちぬ/いざ 逝きめやも
Is a modification of the phrase (pronounced the same as):
風立ちぬ、いざ生きめやも
Which is an old official translation of a French quote from Paul Valery’s Le Cimetiere Marin (Graveyard by the Sea):
Le vent se leve, il faut tenter de vivre.
Which is officially translated into English as:
The wind is rising: we must endeavor to live.
From the Japanese (my translation based on the article):
The wind is rising: and now none of us now wish to live.
(Even so we must endeavor to do so.)

Flip it around with the modified words:
The wind is dying: and now none of us wish to follow. (Even though we must.)
Fixing it around a bit meaning-wise:
Ah, the wind is dying: but now that it has come to this, must we die?
Fitting it back into closer form with the official English from the French we have:
“Ah, the wind is dying: must then we die ourselves?”

Yeah, maybe I try too hard.

For those interested, here is the article: [link]

And here is the particle construction (rare enough to not be in my J↔J dictionary):

[係助]《係助詞「や」+係助詞「も」から。上代語》1 (文中用法)名詞、活用語の已然形に付く。詠嘆を込めた反語の意を表す。詠嘆を込めた疑問の意を表す。2 (文末用法)已然形に付いて、詠嘆を込めた反語の意を表す。…だろうか(いや、そうではない)。已然形・終止形に付いて、詠嘆を込めた疑問の意を表す。…かまあ。→めやも

After, -additional- effort on that one stanza I have changed

“Ah, the wind is dying / Must then we die ourselves?” to “Ah, now that the wind has ceased / How could we just lay down and die?”

If you would like to follow my reasoning, it is in the comments. :D

薔薇殺しのカーミラ
 Baragoroshi no Carmilla
 Rose-Killing Carmilla
歌唱:みとせのりこ
作詞:米山玩具
作編曲:柳英一郎
Bass:柳英一郎
Violin:marina
Circle:Frontier 彩 (Frontier AJA)
Album:紅魔城伝説 妖幻の鎮魂歌 オリジナルサウンドトラック
Event:Reitaisai 8

scarlet sky is falling down
bury me six feet under (x4)
ah…

浅き夢に見し 冷たくなりて
薄き胸に杭だけ突き刺し

Asaki yume ni mishi, tsumetaku narite
Usuki mune ni kui dake tsukisashi

I saw in a shallow dream myself growing cold
A stake driven into my shallow breast

大蛇を縊り 生命浴び
目覚めゆく
愚か民の 還る場所は
滅びほころび

Orochi wo kubiri, inochi abi
Mezame yuku
Oroka tami no, kaeru basho wa
Horobi hokorobi

Strangling the giant serpent, bathing in life
I awaken
The place witless commoners have to return to
Crumbles, undone

朱に染まり 朱に染まり
いま血呑み 咲く花
朱に染まり 朱に染まり
薔薇殺しカーミラ
解き裂かれし唐繰り
口づけよう御霊と
愛しい君に

Shu ni somari, shu ni somari
Ima chi nomi, saku hana
Shu ni somari, shu ni somari
Baragoroshi Carmilla
Hikisakareshi karakuri
Kuchidzukeyou mitama to
Itoshii kimi ni

Soaking in scarlet – Dyeing scarlet
Now this flower drinks blood and blossoms
Soaking in scarlet – Dying scarlet
Rose-Killing Carmilla
All tricks and mechanisms ripped apart
Shall I kiss you with my dead soul
My beloved?

ああ 風断ちぬ
いざ 逝きめやも
ああ 風断ちぬ
いざ―――

Aa, kaze tachinu
Iza, ikimeyamo
Aa, kaze tachinu
Iza—

Ah, now that the wind has ceased
How could we just lay down and die?
Ah, now that the wind has ceased
Now…

浅き夢に見し 冷たくなりて
薄き胸に杭だけ突き刺し

Asaki yume ni mishi, tsumetaku narite
Usuki mune ni kui dake tsukisashi

I saw in a shallow dream myself growing cold
A stake driven into my shallow breast

堕ちた空から 漏れる魂
彷徨えば
我を抱く ぬくもりすら
殺めあやまち

Ochita sora kara, moreru kon
Samayoeba
Ware wo idaku nukumori sura
Ayame ayamachi

From the fell sky rain spirits
Released, wandering
They embrace me, but how can they steal
My warmth when I have none?

朱に染まり 朱に染まり
いま血呑み 咲く花
朱に染まり 朱に染まり
薔薇殺しカーミラ
解き裂かれし唐繰り
口づけよう御霊と
愛しい君に

Shu ni somari, shu ni somari
Ima chi nomi, saku hana
Shu ni somari, shu ni somari
Baragoroshi Carmilla
Hikisakareshi karakuri
Kuchidzukeyou mitama to
Itoshii kimi ni

Soaking in scarlet – Dyeing scarlet
Now this flower drinks blood and blossoms
Soaking in scarlet – Dying scarlet
Rose-Killing Carmilla
All tricks and mechanisms ripped apart
Shall I kiss you with my dead soul
My beloved?

朱に染まり 呪に染まり
いま血呑み 咲く花
朱に染まり 呪に染まり
薔薇殺しレミリア
生き潜めし地の底
いま告げよう光なき
愛しい君に

Shu ni somari, ju ni somari
Ima chi nomi, saku hana
Shu ni somari, ju ni somari
Baragoroshi Remilia
Ikihisomeshi chi no soko
Ima tsugeyou kage naki
Itoshii kimi ni

Soaking in scarlet – Stained with curses
Now this flower drinks blood and blossoms
Soaking in scarlet – Stained with curses
Rose-Killing Remilia
Keeping alive in the depths of the earth
Shall I tell you without light or shadows
My beloved?

scarlet sky is falling down
bury me six feet under (x4)
ah…

    • ChanceWolf
    • June 1st, 2011

    I love it <3 Great work as usual.
    And what do you mean by "reworking the site"?

    • I thinking I might change the theme, and the organization a little – I really like the theme I’ve got but it’s a little restrictive in some areas, which leads to quite a bit of cramping here and there.

      Since I’ve had this theme for so long and have sort of geared my posts for a while to the structure of the theme everything might look crazy for a while ^^;

      I’ve also been thinking of moving the site off wordpress.com, but I don’t think I have enough of a reason to do so yet (and the recent improvements have shifted me back to wanting to stay a little ^^;). I’ll probably just do a little looking and seeing for a while.

    • Naolin
    • June 6th, 2011

    Awesome as always <3

    • Yoshimrua Yuu
    • October 14th, 2012

    風断ちぬ -> 風(wind:Noun)/断ち(die:Verb)/ぬ(Auxiliary verb)

    in this site(http://ja.wikibooks.org/wiki/%E5%8F%A4%E8%AA%9E%E6%B4%BB%E7%94%A8%E8%A1%A8),
    ぬ has two different meanings.
    first, it means 打消(negation).
    second, it means 完了(present), 強意(empahsize) and 並列(parallel).
    in this case,
    断ち is 連用形, so ぬ means 完了(present).
    therefore,
    風断ちぬ is translated into “the wind has been died”.

    i think that いざ, in this case, means “now”.

    逝きめやも -> 逝き(die:verb)/め(Auxiliary verb)/や(Particle)/も(Particle)
    the sentence omitted a subject. (i think it is “私(i)”)
    in this site(http://kobun.weblio.jp/content/%E3%82%81%E3%82%84),
    めや is 反語(rhetorical question).
    therefore, this sentence is translated into “will i die? (no, i must NOT die)”
    .

    sorry i cannot write in English well.

    • First of all, your English is great.

      If you don’t want to read all these crazy tl;dr, just skip to the bottom.

      Yes, translated strictly:
      ああ 風断ちぬ/いざ 逝きめやも
      [ああ]→Ah,
      [風断ちぬ]→[風]+[断つ→連用形→断ち]+[ぬ]→the wind has died/is dead. – definitely not “dying” (but I had a reason for translating it that way, which I address below).

      This is where it gets complicated ^^;
      [逝きめやも]→:[逝く→未然形→(considered as 一段 verb)→逝き]+[む→已然形→め]+[や]+[も]→????

      逝く→逝きむ: first of all, this is grammatically incorrect, as 逝く(whether it is pronounced いく or ゆく) is a 四段 verb and so should be written 逝かむ resulting in 逝かめやも, however if you consider the fact that 逝く is just transposed over 生く (上二段) it makes sense, so you can interpret 逝く (上二段) as “living that which we consider the same as dying” – let’s continue

      But to simplify things, for now let’s just think of 逝きむ as either “we shall surely die” (more weight to supposition) or “let us die” (more weight to volitional)

      Now めやも is a pretty complex construction. Let’s take an example from kobun.weblio.jp (I love weblio too):

      「紫草(むらさき)の匂(にほ)へる妹(いも)を憎くあらば人妻ゆゑに我恋ひめやも」(cutting out the first bit and translating 妹 as “you” even though she happened to be his sister and former wife) “If I hated you, how could I love you, even after you have become someone else’s wife?”

      Here, めやも works like this: め (む as part 推量 and part 意志 (volitional), put in 已然形 (putting it in a case “as if it already happened”) + や (inverse/challenging rhetorical question) + も (emphasis) – in English that is best translated using these words: how could/can it be? (which includes a challenging question, an a false sense of “may or may not” through the words could/can which also imply volitional in certain cases)

      So… at first look: 逝きめやも should be “How could we die?” (which is pretty much what you were saying). If you put a little more consideration to the volitional it would become “How could we endeavor to die?”

      But… at second look 逝きめやも could be “How could we (endeavor to) live in such a way that is to us dying?”

      And… at third look given the poem that it’s referencing:
      風立ちぬ、いざ生きめやも
      “The wind is rising; now that it has come to this,(=いざ) how can we live (implied volition)?”
      Which is supposed to be a translation of,
      “The wind is rising: we must endeavor to live.”
      and we see that volition does play a part in this case, so…
      “The wind is rising; now that it has come to this, how can we endeavor to live?”

      Back when I was first translating the song, I did some research relating the original poem and the translation, and read that めやも was used to emphasize the hopelessness of the situation. “How can we live, when it would be so much easier to die?” and that the emphasis on the moment (though いざ) implied “Though the situation is hopeless, and we feel despair at the mere thought of trying to live, we -must-.”

      Anyway so that resulted in this translation:
      The wind is rising: and now none of us now wish to live.
      (Even so we must endeavor to do so.)

      Since “ああ 風断ちぬ/いざ 逝きめやも” is merely “風立ちぬ、いざ生きめやも” with some meanings flipped around I decided to try to do that with this translation of the original phrase I came up with.

      The wind is dying: and now none of us now wish to die.
      (Even so we must endeavor to do so.)

      Tweaked several times into:
      “Ah, the wind is dying: must then we die ourselves?”

      However, I wasn’t as adept at classical grammar at the time and so looking at it now, it would be much better if it were something like this, I think:

      “Ah, now that the wind has died, how could we endeavor to live in such a way that is to us dying?”

      Shortened, stripping it down (throwing out the dual meaning of 逝く as a 上二段), with a few substitutions and removing duplicate words:

      “Ah, now that the wind has ceased / How could we just lay down and die?”

      That results in this sort of meaning…:

      Now that the wind (storms, interference, people that killed us before, what have you) has died away, how could we (like “living beings”) just lay down and die? (You could even interpret this part as laying quiet in the earth not dead or alive, which keeps the (possible) duality of 逝く) No, instead, we will rise/live (as undead).

      Alright, sounds good, I’ll change it to that.

      In short:

      You’re not wrong -at all-, there’s just a lot more factors to take into account ^^; and thanks a lot for bringing me back to this. I absolutely -love- analyzing 古文 stuff. Also, because of your comment, the translation’s probably changed for the better.

        • Yoshimrua Yuu
        • October 14th, 2012

        thank you for your reply.

        your knowledge of 古文 is superior to that of Japanese.
        i didnt know that in old grammar,
        first 生く was 四段 verb, then it changed 上二段 verb.
        (in modern Japanese grammar, 生く is 上一段 verb)

        this is a great translation and interpretation!

  1. Question – you imply that there’s a poem this is based off of in the comments. What’s the title/source of the poem?

    • tenkoirigo
    • December 1st, 2013

    If I’m not mistaken, the kanji 抱く (Wrap/Hug) can be read both as idaku and daku, am I correct? Please correct me if I’m wrong, but from my own ears, I could hear them being read as “idaku” in this song; especially during “・・・ 我を抱く 温もりすら ・・・”.
    What are your thoughts about this?

    Your translation and transliteration abilities are amazing.

    • You are right – usually いだく is used more often if it’s a concept or an idea so I overlooked it – I just changed it – thanks!

  1. June 13th, 2011

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